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How to Grow a Vertical Succulent Garden

How to Grow a Vertical Succulent Garden


Succulents and vertical planters team up to provide several benefits. Succulents require less water than traditional garden plants, and they are relatively low maintenance. Vertical planters add interest to otherwise plain walls and fences and save valuable ground space. Put the two together, and you have a planter with a wow factor that does not require its own full-time gardener.

If you know a few tips, you can create a wide variety of vertical succulent planters yourself for a portion of the cost of buying commercial vertical planters.

1. Use small crates, shadow boxes, painting frames, or simple wooden boxes as your planter's base. Choose a box to create your planter roughly 2 inches (5 cm) deep. Deeper planters may lead to compacting, shifting, and sinking soil.

2. Cover the top of your planter in 0.25 inch (0.5 cm) mesh wire hardware cloth. It holds your plants and soil in place while still giving them room to grow and spread out.

3. Use plants that all have similar care instructions. It takes more than one season for your plants to grow and fill out the planter box, so they will need to be overwintered. Understand that some succulents must go through a dormant period, some succulents will withstand cold temperatures, and others must be kept indoors. Plan accordingly.

4. Leave the vertical planter on a flat surface for two to three months before you hang it, or your plants may not develop the strong root systems they need to both survive and avoid falling out of the planter.

5. Skip watering your vertical succulent garden for a week after planting to let the roots harden and establish their place in the soil. Water weekly in summer and spring, and monthly in winter and fall. Take the whole planter down off the wall, and lay it on a flat surface to avoid washing away the soil inside.

6. Fertilize with a mix of one part liquid houseplant fertilizer to four parts water once per month during the summer growing season.

Source: sfgate.com

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DIY: Easy Vertical Succulent Garden from a Wood Pallet

Do you still have a pallet? Don’t throw it away, because you can do such fun things with it in the garden. From lounge sofas to vegetable gardens: pallets are fantastic! This time I will tell you how to make a vertical succulent garden.

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What do you need?

What should you do?

A vertical garden is incredibly easy to make if you stick to the following step-by-step plan.

  1. Sand the pallet and possibly give it a different color. Green succulents, for example, stand out better when the wood is dark.
  1. Place the weed barrier over the pallet, fold it back 2x and cut the cloth. By using it several layers, the weed barrier is firmer.

  1. Staple the cloth with a staple gun. There is no guideline on how many staples to use, but make sure the cloth is secure and cannot tear.

  1. Lay the pallet with the weed barrier on the ground and fill it with soil. Make sure you place the vertical garden where it should be, because once filled the project is almost impossible to move.

Succulents are very easy to maintain and look great both in the house and in the garden. But you are not obliged to use these plants. It also works well with herbs or other ‘small’ plants.


Grow Succulents Up a Wall

You can also create an entire frame to go against your walls, which is great for outdoors. Most living walls are back and front, but this is not an absolute. If you’re handy with putting wood together, try this option. Add shelves with drainage in which to plant or shelves in which to locate containers.

Some succulents, like those of the creeping sedum family, can be planted in the ground and encouraged to grow up a wall outdoors. As herbaceous perennials, they die back in winter in cold areas. Reattaching might be necessary each spring as they emerge. They also make attractive groundcover if you decide to abandon the chore and leave them growing.


Living Succulent Picture Frame

Forget average frames filled with photos—add a truly unique element to your walls with this personalized project. Make use of an antique frame you have lying around the house and breathe new life into it with a stunning succulent design. Although it may look elaborate, this DIY vertical succulent garden can be created in just a few hours—and with proper care, its beauty will last for months. Simply lay the frame flat and water the succulents about once a month, letting dry before hanging again. This living mosaic is a true showstopper.

Make it yourself: Succulent Picture Frame


Tips on How to Grow Succulents Vertically

Related Articles

Succulents and vertical planters team up to provide a number of benefits. Succulents require less water than traditional garden plants, and they're relatively low maintenance. Vertical planters add interest to otherwise plain walls and fences, and save valuable ground space. Put the two together and you have a planter with a wow factor that doesn't require its own full-time gardener. If you know a few tips, you can create a wide variety of vertical succulent planters yourself for a portion of the cost of buying commercial vertical planters.

Use small crates, shadow boxes, painting frames or simple wooden boxes as your planter's base. Choose a box to create your planter that's roughly 2 inches deep, as deeper planters may lead to compacting, shifting and sinking soil, according to the Sonoma County Master Gardeners.

Cover the top of your planter in 1/4-inch mesh wire hardware cloth. It holds your plants and soil in place while still giving them room to grow and spread out.

Use plants that all have similar care instructions. It takes more than one season for your plants to grow and fill out the planter box, so they'll need overwintered. Understand that some succulents must go through a dormant period, some succulents will withstand cold temperatures and others must be kept indoors. Plan accordingly.

Leave the vertical planter on a flat surface for two to three months before you hang it or your plants may not develop the strong root systems they need to both survive and avoid falling out of the planter.

Skip watering your vertical succulent garden for a week after planting to let the roots harden and establish their place in the soil. Water weekly in the summer and spring, and monthly in the winter and fall. Use less water for winter feedings. Take the whole planter down off the wall, and lay it on a flat surface to avoid washing away the soil inside.


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